Martin S. Fisher is the Executive Director of Science Central (Fort Wayne, IN). Martin has worked over 30 years in the science center and museum field. He holds a B.S. degree in Zoology from Miami University (Oxford, Ohio) with an emphasis in vertebrate ecology and a M.A. degree in Science Education from The Ohio State University (Columbus, Ohio) with an emphasis in environmental education and educational psychology.

The Two-Way
9:44 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Timbuktu's Treasures Are Being Destroyed As World Watches Helplessly

This image from a video shows Islamist militants destroying an ancient shrine in Timbuktu on Sunday.
AFP/Getty Images

Once again the world is watching with increasing alarm as religious extremists destroy centuries-old historical sites because they find them offensive.

In 2001 it was the towering statues of Buddha in Bamiyan, Afghanistan, that were turned into rubble by the Taliban.

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Listen to WBOI 89.1 or WBNI 94.1 online, anytime and anywhere! The following links to our internet streaming stations are for use with third-party programs and devices that accept .pls, .m3u or .asx streaming audio.

NOTE: If you're using iTunes, we recommend the AAC .pls link. We do not recommend using AAC links with Windows Media Player.

If the AAC links do not work with your device or program, try the MP3 links.
 

WBOI (NPR News and Music):

For MP3 Audio and use with Internet Radio devices:

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Bruce Reidenbach has been a volunteer jazz host at WBOI/WBNI since 1983.  His favorite music is anything that has a lyrical melody with a bit of underlying complication to the rhythm and harmony, typically found in 50s and 60s bebop.  More modern styles from Weather Report and the Pat Metheny Group are also a favorite.  In real life, Bruce is an electrical engineer and when not listening to music enjoys football (American and European, i.e., soccer), Formula One auto racing, and is a loyal Purdue Boilermaker alumni and fan.

The Two-Way
7:16 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Power's Still Out For Nearly 2 Million, And Intense Heat Continues

In Silver Spring, Md., on Monday, Matt MacCartney was one of many workers dismantling fallen trees that took down power lines.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 3:42 pm

As the day gets started, about 1.8 million homes and businesses in states stretching from Indiana east through the mid-Atlantic are still without power because of the enormous damage caused by Friday's derecho. That's the huge wall of severe storms that swept across towns and cities from Indiana east to the Atlantic coast.

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Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Joe Palca is a science correspondent for NPR. Since joining NPR in 1992, Palca has covered a range of science topics — everything from biomedical research to astronomy. In addition to his science reporting, Palca occasionally fills in as guest host on Talk of the Nation Science Friday.

Palca began his journalism career in television in 1982, working as a health producer for the CBS affiliate in Washington, DC. In 1986, he left television for a seven-year stint as a print journalist, first as the Washington news editor for Nature, and then as a senior correspondent for Science Magazine.

Middle East
3:31 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Can Sanctions Force Iran To Change Its Policies?

Iranian workers make repairs to a unit at Tehran's oil refinery in November 2007. It's estimated that a Western oil embargo is costing Iran about $4.5 billion each month in lost revenue.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 8:17 am

Whether economic sanctions can force a government to change course is far from clear, but Iran should be a good test case.

A European Union embargo on Iranian oil took full effect this week, complementing U.S. measures that have grown much more severe in recent weeks. Other Western sanctions now in place target Iranian banks, foreign companies that provide shipping insurance for Iranian oil tankers, and foreign firms that invest in the Iranian oil industry.

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Science
3:30 am
Tue July 3, 2012

When Ice Cream Attacks: The Mystery Of Brain Freeze

NPR interns (from left) Angela Wong and Kevin Uhrmacher participate in an experiment to induce brain freeze.
Benjamin Morris NPR

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 2:12 pm

If it hasn't happened to you, count yourself as lucky. For many people, eating ice cream or drinking an icy drink too fast can produce a really painful headache. It usually hits in the front of the brain, behind the forehead.

The technical name for this phenomenon is cold-stimulus headache, but people also refer to it as "ice cream headache" or "brain freeze."

The good news is that brain freeze is easy to prevent — just eat more slowly. The other bit of good news is these headaches don't last very long — a minute at the outside.

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Money & Politics
3:29 am
Tue July 3, 2012

Gay Donors Open Wallets On Both Sides Of The Aisle

President Obama is introduced by singer Ricky Martin at a fundraiser hosted by Martin and the LGBT Leadership Council at the Rubin Museum of Art on May 14 in New York.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 8:26 am

In politics, money talks. And money from gay and lesbian donors is talking louder than ever in this election cycle.

That's partly a result of President Obama endorsing same-sex marriage, and it's partly because Republicans are starting to see contributions as well.

That's a huge change from just a few decades ago.

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